Article Categories
[ Show ] All [ Hide ]
Clean Language
Article Selections
[ Show ] All [ Hide ]
 
 »  Home  »  Symbolic Modelling  »  Advanced SyM
Advanced SyM
Advanced articles about James Lawley and Penny Tompkins' process: Symbolic Modelling.

(Page 1 of 2)   « Back | 1 | 2 | Next »
Symbolic Modelling and the Emergence of Background Knowledge
This article addresses the distinction between the two ways of 'Second Positioning': (a) going to Second Position with the person being modelled and what they are doing; and (b) going to Second Position with the information and the way the information is input, processed and output by the person being modelled. The first approach is typical of sensory modelling while the second approach is the preferred mode of Symbolic Modelling.
Using Metaphors with Coaching

As a tool for coaching, the client's metaphors give you an insight into their unique perception of their situation and their goals. When the client tells you that they can 'see light at the end of the tunnel', that is what they are experiencing. There is light for them, and they are in a tunnel. They will unconsciously 'know' much more about their situation from this metaphoric viewpoint.

Coaching for P.R.O.s

Being able to make the distinction between a Problem, a Remedy and desired Outcome statement is vital to being an 'outcome orientated' facilitator. This article gives detailed instructions on how to recognise client's PRO statements and how to respond so that you have more choice about where you guide their attention.

PRO can also be used to keep meetings on track, to keep a group in a creative state, to move people beyond conflict towards a joint outcome, or in numerous other productive ways.

When 'Where' Matters: How psychoactive space is created and utilised
'where' jigsawA joined-up model of how methodologies derived from the work of David Grove invoke the psychoactivity of spatial relations in therapeutic, as well as in other settings. Once a space becomes psychoactive a person is effectively 'living in their metaphor'. Then, when something changes in that perceptual space (often spontaneously), more of their mind-body is involved. This usually produces a more embodied and systemic change.
Polished Verse - An interview with Penny Tompkins and James Lawley
An interview with Penny Tompkins and James Lawley by John Soderlund, editor New Therapist.
Mind, Metaphor and Health
Published in Positive Health in 2002, we explain why metaphor is a natural way to describe illness and health, the importance of recognising patient/client metaphors, and how working within these metaphors can activate an individual's personal healing process.
A Model of Musing: The Message in a Metaphor
This article describes a model for a way of thinking during those few seconds when you are pondering what the client has just said. It describes a way of modelling-in-the-moment; a way to ensure that what you decide to say is maximally informed by the client's information.
Metaphors of Organisation part 2
This is the second part of a two-part article:

Part 1 explained that underlying every theory of management or organisation is a metaphor. It described eight commonly used metaphors and Gareth Morgan's method for analysing and facilitating organisations to change.

Part 2 shows how Symbolic Modelling uses client-generated metaphors to facilitate individuals to understand and change themselves and their organisations.

Going Live
Although there is only 'now', we get seduced by the idea/metaphor that there are other times. We talk about the past and future as if they exist rather than being figments of our momentary imagination. As clean facilitators we retain the knowledge that whatever the client is saying or doing, neurologically and physiologically it's happening now. We also assume that the client’s behaviour is always embodying their current model of the world but they are often unaware of it. When we 'go live' we are inviting the client to attend to that model, metaphor or behaviour, in-the-moment, as it happens. In this way the client becomes aware of, and stays close to what is happening for them 'right here, right now'.
It’s about time: Modelling frames of desire
Desired outcomes, aims, goals, intentions, objectives, plans, purposes and targets all describe a preferred future. When in the future and what kind of outcome makes a difference to how we facilitate clients to realise their desires. Whether a person wants to take a decision in the here and now, or to enjoy the rest of their life, involves different timeframes and structurally different outcomes. This paper examines modelling the timeframes, structures and evidence of client’s desires.


(Page 1 of 2)   « Back | 1 | 2 | Next »
Advanced
Clean Language &
Symbolic Modelling
Workshop

10-11 March 2018
Sydney, Australia

with James Lawley
and
Penny Tompkins


view all featured events